art journaling magazine · Collage · Collage - From Trash · creativity · Miscellaneous · Mixed Media · published art · somerset studio

The good, the bad and the ugly: Published and humbled x 2

Art published Somerset Studio May 2019 HOPE COVER

Repurposed Art Journal – “hope”
Artist: Carol A. More
2019

Can it possibly be more than a few months since I last put something out there? Yep. No excuses either. You know why? Because I’ve been immersed in a flurry of creativity! And fortifying my home and yard for the upcoming hurricane season. We had the distinction of being “Ground Zero” for Hurricane Florence last year and while optimistic, our sweet little historic town – still recovering from Flo’s devastating fury – bracing for a ‘second’ lightning strike. Art is my only constant these days.

I’ve got a few fun things out there coming up for publication in Stampington Press’ Art Journaling quarterly.  My 15 minutes of fame dissolved with the past issue of Somerset Studio magazine but not before I could get this pic of me and the cover shot of my art in the mag in our local Books-A-Million store! Three little giggling girls running through the store and when I asked the tallest of the three to snap a pic with my phone, she serious-ed up in a New York minute and voila…she took a good photo, right? Seriously, I still tingle in a humble way, when I see my artwork in these first-class mags that have been my inspiration for years, and I hope I never take it for granted! Feeling grateful and blessed!

CMore at Books A Million 2019

I have to admit I’m so blown away by the beautiful artwork in all Stampington Press’ publications. The artists are first-rate but the photography is absolutely dazzling. And…To think that artists are creating such beauty is jaw-dropping and inspiring. As I read the artists’ words for each published piece, I feel a bit intimidated because I feel we are all creating for the same reason: sanity. Do you agree?  I’ll try for something more original next time, I promise.

Anyway, my husband suggested I write a blurb about what was published last quarter. I sometimes don’t know what is actually going to show up in print and when I frantically rip through my advanced copy I confess I’ve had moments when I whine…”no, please, not THIS one?!” thinking it was a hot mess and wondering what anyone (the talented trained eyes from Stampington Press’ staff, namely) saw in it. Lesson learned, Universe and by the way, THANK YOU, Universe and all the beautiful souls who appreciate my efforts. I’m showing you this pic of an example of what I mean. So this page…ugh…to me, it was ghastly and I nearly ripped it out before sending. I was working with VERY old, brittle (moldy smelling) children’s activity books from the 1940s – I’ve since tossed them because they scented my entire art lab – and as I was cutting out the image, the paper was literally crumbling, amputating little hands, knees, heads. Grisly work. I pieced it together with Mod Podge, each itty bitty piece of paper. Then the awful painting of the seaweed ‘nymph’ above them…and check out the text I highlighted! Yep, the word ‘bastard’ shows up with an ethnic slur (French). I seem to be stuck in 6th grade humor, and I thought it was funny to be a bit irreverent in an art journal, but when it showed up in the magazine, I wondered if I should be more careful in the future. Naw. I love creating and seeing this published allowed me to build confidence in what ended up in my artwork!  Don’t know about you, but I frequently paint over something I think doesn’t measure up. Maybe in the future, I’ll not be so hasty? So, a bit of a ragged summary: put it out there with good intention and allow others to appreciate what you’ve created.

Somerset Studio 2019

Have a lovely summer, everyone and looking forward to seeing what you are creating these days!  Next post: Currently, I’m heavily censoring my thoughts before putting them in print. I recently made a request to join a sarcastically (I do love me some good sarcasm from time-to-time), snobby Altered Book Facebook page and being turned down – in fact, my request was IGNORED….I’m humbled but wondering what’s the point of turning anyone away that met the strict qualifications for joining?  Oh well…..later! 

11 thoughts on “The good, the bad and the ugly: Published and humbled x 2

  1. Carol…I’m so happy to have found your blog. I think we are very similar in our art journies. I feel the same way about art pieces I feel are sub-par, and then if it makes its way into the world and someone sees value in it, I am stumped by that. I guess we really are our own worst critics, huh? The image of the altered book on this post is awesome. I am going to steal your idea of cutting the top of one of mine that way, do you mind? I look forward to reading more of your blog. BTW, I am looking for a FB group for altered books. I hope I don’t run into the snobby one who turned you away…how rude!! Art on…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Steal away, Sally and thanks for your feedback. I’m sure at some point, someone’s idea inspired me and when we study other’s techniques and styles, it’s nearly impossible to copy it exactly since we all create from our own unique-ness. RE: Cutting the book? Yikes. I use sewn books when I saw them into shapes, but stabilize the binding first AND remove any pages before sawing. There were some tense moments. RE: the FB group’s snub – it just might be the universe’s way of telling me to skip FB. It’s been a black hole with questionable time value for me. I’m not social media averse but I’m successful drawing my inspiration from other media. Like books – I’m a book hoarder and have even accidentally purchased the same book TWICE forgetting I already had a copy!

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    2. I have discovered that there are a lot of us who found art through either tragedy or very bad circumstances. I was a music major in college, taught piano for years, and loved to play and sing, but in 1995 everything changed. Tragedy early in the year, my husband got laid off from his job in the summer, we came back from a trip to find half of our house under water due to a washer hose that burst, and then my daughter left in September for college and we were alone again. I signed up for cable TV and spent my days watching HGTV, which had wonderful craft shows on all day long. And the music stopped.
      When we picked up my daughter from college for Christmas break, I wandered into a little shop in
      Gatlinburg that had gifts on one side and stamps on the other. I was browsing through the stamps, having no clue what to do with them, when the shop owner said these fateful words: would you like a demonstration? She embossed something in gold, and I knew immediately that I was born to do this. I bought an embossing kit, one large stamp, and some cheap markers from Walmart (and learned right away not to go cheap!), and went back to the hotel and embossed over a light bulb.
      That was 24 years ago, and while I have never developed into anything more than a rubber stamper who does mostly cards, stamp art has been my salvation. I just recently started doing a little playing and singing, but I’m pretty rusty. The latest thing that stamping has helped me through was having two trees drop on our house during Florence. We still aren’t back in our house, but the walls are up!
      I loved seeing your work, and especially loved reading your article in Somerset Studio. I live across the river from Wimington, and would love to meet you sometime. Maybe I will make it to New Bern for an art event at some point. As the above correspondent said, art on!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Oh my goodness, Janis. How nice of you to take the time to tell your creative journey story! You are very good with the written word, too. I would very much love to see your work. It’s so hopefully gratifying to have like minds as friends, too. I’ve made another amazing friend when she had her work published in Somerset Studio magazine, Bobbie Wilson, who has also inspired me in so many ways. We trade art and so I’ll extend that invitation to you as well. It’s like Christmas to receive her packages. And yes, our creative endeavors bridge the gap from tragedy to triumph smoothing those bumps in life – sounds like you’ve had your share of challenges. But then I tell my friends “I’ve been around the block a few times, so naturally, we’ve experienced more!” Thank you so much for responding to my post AND for telling your story. It’s quite inspiring! Let’s stay in touch.

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      2. How’s it going down there, Janis? Thought about you recently and hope all is well with your house reconstruction post-Florence. It’s healing up here too. Are you creating any artwork? My email is carol@carolmore.com if you have any plans to come north soon? My art lab studio just had a total redo and looks and feels AMAZING. Let’s keep in touch?

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    3. OMG! I think I lost your original post on my blog, Sally if I didn’t respond immediately, for that I am truly embarrassed and sorry. I gave up on the FB site. It felt like the same few people were posting their work – very inspiring I might add – but I guess I don’t prefer FB. I have an Instagram site now @CarolAMoreArtist and have been putting some things on it ….veerrrryyy slllloowwwly. After all, we should be doing art, not talking about it, right? Best wishes and thank you for your sweet post. Forgive my brain if this is a dupe response…it’s been so long! ha ha ha!

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  2. A lovely post Carol. I love the shot of you in the book store with your published art. Forget the snobby art group on Facebook – they’re not worthy of you and clearly have over inflated opinions of themselves… :))

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